"));
porno izleporno izleporno izleturkce pornoporno
AACVR-GERMANY.ORG GHI HCA VASSAR NAACP Header

Web This site

 

 


SHARE YOUR STORY   WITH US:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

“So we must speak, even as we fight and die. We must say that the fight against Hitlerism begins in Washington, D.C., the capital of our nation, where black Americans have a status only slightly above that of Jews of Berlin. [...] If the ghettos in Poland are evil, so are the ghettos in America.“

Editorial, “Now Is the Time,” The Crisis, January 1942, 7.

 




NEWS:

New Documentary:
"Ein Hauch von Freiheit" (Breath of Freedom)
December 16, 10:05pm CET on Arte
> more

 

Documentary:
"Breath of Freedom: Black Soldiers and the Battle for Civil Rights" (narrated by Cuba Gooding, Jr.)
Premiers February 17, 8pm ET/PT on Smithsonian Channel
> more

 

Article:
"Freed's enduring photos of march part of exhibit"
> more

 

Article by
Sophie Lorenz:
„Heldin des anderen Amerikas“
Die DDR-Solidaritätsbewegung
für Angela Davis, 1970–1973.
> more



New Film:
"The West Point -
Vassar College Initiative"
> more



A Breath of Freedom
By Maria Höhn &
Martin Klimke
Palgrave Macmillan October 2010
> more

 

.

Uncategorised

 

Black Wives, White Maids:
Social Implications of Black Military Wives in US-Occupied Germany
by Felicitas R. Jaima

In June 1957, the Minister President of Bavaria wrote a letter to Lt. General Clarke of the Seventh Army in which he asks “if US forces would consider it possible to send only married colored soldiers to the Federal Republic.”(1) A summary of the Civil Affairs Division of the US Military explains that this letter was motivated by “incidents between Germans and members of the US Forces in Bavaria” that often involved black soldiers.(2) The activities report further reveals that the Civil Affairs Division “recommended to the Commander in Chief that no reply be made to [the Minister President of Bavaria] from this headquarters and that the problem of the assignment of colored personnel in US Army units stationed in Bavaria be carefully explained to the Minister President by [the] Land Relations Officer, Bavaria.”(3)

Historian Donna Alvah has identified military dependents overseas as “unofficial ambassadors” of democracy whose mission it was to model American values while bringing normalcy to military communities abroad.(4) The Chicago Defender poignantly summarizes their role as “showing the way back to good, old familiar things like Sunday picnics, a day on the beach, an evening before the fire – the things that wives have always stood for to military men for ages past.”(5) The letter cited above, however, suggests that the role of black dependents was even more complex. Interracial relationships between black GIs and German women not only offended many conservative Germans but also provoked white American soldiers in Germany, often resulting in racial clashes.(6) The black military wife, many hoped, would disrupt the increasing numbers of these relationships. Ironically, this article argues, while black women were sent abroad for the purpose of decreasing racial tensions, in the process they inadvertently challenged racial norms. As they developed close friendships with their white German maids, African American military women turned race relations on their head.(7)

***


From the late 1940s onward, military wives traveled to Germany in increasing numbers. The New York Amsterdam News reported in 1951 that “more than 1,000 American women and children” had just arrived in Bremerhaven by sea and that “the group included quite a number of Negro families.”(8) Many of the women, the article states, had not seen their husbands for more than a year, and some children had never even met their fathers. While awaiting their passage abroad, black American women were well aware of the appeal that white German women had on black GIs. Höhn has explored the inextricable link between black masculinity and democracy on one hand and American GI’s access to white women on the other.(9) Interracial relationships in occupied Germany clearly contributed to the soldiers’ “breath of freedom.”(10) African American women, in contrast, perceived of these relationships quite differently. In letters to the editor, they lamented that “the arrival of each new ‘war bride’ means ‘one less brown man’ in the marriage market,” and that “this vision of democracy ignored the aspirations for full citizenship of black women.”(11) Consequently, many women must have been quite eager to join their husbands abroad, arguably having their own agenda that was well aligned with the wishes of the Minister President of Bavaria.

Although marginalized in official records of the US military presence abroad, African American military women critically shaped the social landscape of postwar and Cold War Germany in many arenas. For instance, they drastically increased the points of contact between Germans and Americans. As families would mingle in churches, at sports events, and come together for other recreational activities, the attitude of Germans towards black soldiers improved: “For the first time the German people were able to meet Negroes as a part of the entire social scheme and not just as some members of an army far from their homes and constantly on the lookout for excitement – which usually meant girls.”(12)

The most intriguing encounter, however, took place in military homes. Given the American spending power in the 1950 and 1960s, many American families could afford to hire German women as maids.(13) One military study states that “the average American women coming to the community [in Germany] was overjoyed to hear she would have a maid.”(14) When considering the history of black female domestic labor in the United States, not to mention the racial status quo at that time, one can only imagine what a German maid meant for a black wife. This arrangement radically challenged American race relations and certainly created “breaths of freedom” for black women. And according to Ebony, German women also enjoyed their new employers: 

Because of the economic situation, thousands of middle class German women, who never worked before the war, are now serving as domestics for Negroes. Strangely, many of these women – although they lived for years under Hitler – have asked to work in colored homes…many of them have just learned that Negroes are much more generous with food, cast-off clothing and other supplies than the white Americans.(15)

This arrangement facilitated one of the most influential German-American relationships: the friendship between African American military wives and their German maids. Given the naturally close contact between families and their domestic help, this relationship received a lot of attention in military circles as a central German-American encounter. According to one study of dependents in Germany between 1946 and 1951:

The relationship with German maids was the largest single avenue of social intercourse for Americans…In many instances German domestic help may have been the sole, and undoubtedly in the majority of cases was the most intimate source of American dependent contact with the German people…a contact experienced by the greatest percentage of American dependents.(16)

The study continues to emphasize the intimacy of the relationship between the maid and the family, explaining that there were cases in which the American family had “entertained the maid’s children as weekend guests, given the maid her wedding reception, or driven her long distances to meet her relatives.”(17) In addition, it explains that the American emphasis on individualism stood in stark contrast to German paternal authoritarianism. In this context, it stresses that “democratic treatment of the maid, sometimes as a companion, often as an equal invited to dine with the family, in effect challenges the traditional social caste system of the Germans.”(18) The maid, therefore, emerges as a key figure in the American occupation of Germany.


A case study of the Air Base of Fürstenfeldbruck further confirms the prevalence of this employment situation, particularly in the early years of the occupation. The study explains that “in order to keep requisitioned property in good condition, each dependent family at Fürstenfeldbruck Air Base was assigned one maid.”(19) Consequently, 181 maids worked on this base as of February 1947.(20) While the study acknowledges that language barriers initially presented great obstacles to the family-maid relationship, it explains that due to the prolonged American presence and resulting German-American exchanges, Germans quickly grew accustomed to the second language in their environment.


Personal interviews with former military wives add important insider perspectives to these studies. When Perrie Haymon - an African American woman born in South Carolina - moved to West Germany in 1955, she left behind a society in which Jim Crow still defined the racial status quo. Living in a house on base, Haymon, like all wives of officers, enjoyed the service of a German maid. She recalls that she and her maid went on regular “day trips” downtown and that she learned a lot about German culture and customs from her maid.(21) Gloria Brown, born in New Jersey, came to Germany in 1966 as the wife of an Air Force Junior Officer. Stationed in Bitburg, she employed a young German girl to clean her apartment twice a month. Brown explains that “she even helped me with the language at times.”(22)

The interviews, however, also speak to complexities of this relationship that remain only suggestive in official sources.(23) A survey from the late 1940s reveals that out of 161 maids that were interviewed, 43 claimed that they dated American servicemen and that many desired to marry an American, if only as a “ticket to the United States.”(24) Among military wives, rumors about husbands’ affairs with maids circulated widely. Stories in the black American press further stoked this fear. One article, for instance, describes the experiences of a military wife from Chicago who followed her husband to Frankfurt only to discover that he had hired his three girlfriends as her maids.(25) Eloise P. Walters claimed that she had heard of several similar incidents. Consequently, hoping to not jeopardize her marriage, she confided to me that she hired an older, less attractive maid.(26)

At the same time, it is important to understand that black military wives also engaged in extra-marital affairs with German men. Jet claimed that some wives fell for “the charms of blond German men and unaccustomed leisure.”(27) And also the Afro-American reported that “colored army wives fall in love with them [broad-chested Teutonic Romeos] easily enough for the thrill of ‘getting something different’.”(28) Interracial relationships, therefore, appealed to both African American men and women.(29)

***


As was predicted by the Minister President of Bavaria, African American military wives deescalated racial tensions resulting from liaisons between black GIs and German women. As a result of their presence, Ebony claimed in 1952, “German girls, who once found themselves at a premium when the war ended are now not nearly as popular with the Negro soldier.” And interestingly, this article demonstrates, black women’s efforts to re-claim black GIs as their lovers and partners converged with the German and American vision for restoring “racial order.”

But black women’s influence did not stop here. Once abroad, they actively participated in and shaped social life. And ultimately, through their relationships with German maids and German men, they broke down the very racial barriers that they were sent out to uphold.

 

 

 

***

Felicitas R. Jaima received her Ph.D. in African Diaspora History from New York University with a second concentration in Colonial African History in 2016. She also holds an M.A. in African American History from Seton Hall University. Her research, firmly rooted in African Diaspora scholarship, brings together historical approaches to studying the black experience with Black European studies. As an associate scholar with “The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs, and Germany,” Jaima has conducted over twenty interviews with former enlisted women and military spouses. Her current book project, Adopting Diaspora: African American Military Women in Cold War West Germany, uncovers the activism of black American military women in hitherto understudied areas of the US military presence abroad including the household, hair salons, and schools. African American military women, she argues, protested racial and gender inequalities in daily life and ultimately made critical contributions to the Civil Rights Movement back home, while at the same time creating a distinct vision of diaspora for Germany’s growing black population. The following article zooms in on the formative relationship that, facilitated by Cold War structures, developed between black military wives and their German maids.
> for more, please see.

 ***


(1) Civil Affairs Division, Headquarters USAREUR, Activities Report, July 8, 1958, Folder “Civil Affairs Division, Activities Report, 1957-58,” Box 1041 (1957-58), RG 549 Records of the U.S. Army Europe, United States Army Europe, Records of the Civil Affairs Division, NARA.
(2) Ibid.
(3) Ibid.
(4) Donna Alvah, Unofficial Ambassadors: American Military Families Overseas and the Cold War, 1946-1965 (New York: New York University Press, 2007).
(5) “Women ‘Take Over’ in Army Zones Abroad,” The Chicago Defender, April 17, 1948, 13.
(6) For a thorough analysis of these relationships and the resulting tensions among both the German community and the U.S. military community see Maria Höhn, GIs and Fräuleins: The German-American Encounter in 1950s West Germany (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina University Press, 2002).
(7) Black military wives, of course, also developed friendships and relationships with neighbors, colleagues, and other Germans, including Afro-Germans, but these interactions go beyond the scope of this article.
(8) Floyd Snelson, “Wives, Kids of GI’s Arrive in Germany,” New York Amsterdam News, December 1, 1951, 2M.
(9) Maria Höhn, “Love Across the Color Line: The Limits of German and American Democracy, 1945-1968,” in Larry A. Greene and Anke Ortlepp, eds., Germans and African Americans: Two Centuries of Exchange (Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi, 2011), 107.
(10) Maria Höhn and Martin Klimke, A Breath of Freedom: The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs, and Germany (New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2010).
(11) Höhn, “Love Across the Color Line,” 122 n.15.
(12) Negro Families Flock to Join Soldiers in Germany,” Ebony (January, 1952), 58.
(13) The going monthly rate of 50-70DM for a general housemaid who worked 60 hours a week and was provided meals and quarters was a bargain for many military families. See “Employment of Domestics in Germany,” Annex A, Folder 292 “Servants,” Box 653, RG 549, Records of the Special Staff, Office of the Adjutant General, Operations and Records Branch, General Correspondence 1949 and 1952-53, NARA.
(14) “History of the Fürstenfeldbruck Dependents’ Community,” 14, Box 4386, RG 0498, Headquarters, European Theaters of Operation, U.S. Army, Entry #UD834 “History of the Fürstenfeldbruck Dependents’ Community, Apr. 1946-March 1947,” NARA.
(15) “Negro Families Flock to Join Soldiers in Germany,” Ebony (January, 1952), 58-59.
(16) “Problems of USAFE Dependents, 1946-1951,” 231, 8-3.8 AA 8 – 8-3.8 AA 9, 1948, Historical Manuscript Collection, CMH.
(17) Ibid., 233.
(18) Ibid., 238.
(19) “History of the Fürstenfeldbruck Dependents’ Community,” 13, Box 4386, RG 0498, Headquarters, European Theaters of Operation, U.S. Army, Entry #UD834 “History of the Fürstenfeldbruck Dependents’ Community, Apr. 1946-March 1947,” NARA.
(20) Ibid.
(21) Perrie Haymon, Personal Interview, July 9, 2011.
(22) Gloria Brown, Personal Letter, April 21, 2011.
(23) In Adopting Diaspora, I explore at length the adoptions of German biracial children by African American military women. In this context, I also discuss the family-maid relationship and the ways in which it became surprisingly intricate when couples hired pregnant maids, mostly those who expected a child fathered by a black GI, only to adopt the child once it was born.
(24) “Problems of USAFE Dependents, 1946-1951,” 234, 8-3.8 AA 8 – 8-3.8 AA 9, 1948, Historical Manuscript Collection, CMH.
(25) Ibid.
(26) Eloise P. Walters, Personal Interview, July 9, 2011.
(27) “The Truth About Army Wives,” Jet, September 2, 1954, p.30.
(28) Golf Dornself, “Love Secrets of an Army Post…” Afro-American, April 18, 1953, A5.
(29) Considering the historical representation of the black male as hypersexual perpetrator mutilating the white woman, the relationships between black GIs and German women were perceived as much more threatening than those between black American women and German men. In addition, they also occurred in much greater numbers since many more GIs were stationed in Germany than black military women.
(30) “Frauleins Losing Appeal as Negro Women Join Mates,” Ebony (January, 1952), 60.

 

Das Black Panther Movement in Augsburg

Julia Dehm, Universität Augsburg


This research project was developed in the context of a seminar during the summer semester 2014 at the University of Augsburg, Germany. The seminar "Between Occupation, "Americanization" and the Fight For Civil Rights: The Deployment of the US Armed Forces in Western Germany" was taught in the Department of European Ethnology by visiting Professor Dr. Maria Höhn, Vassar College. Over the course of a year, five students continued working under supervision of Prof. Dr. Günther Kronenbitter on the Black Panther Movement in Augsburg in the late 1960s and early 1970s. 

Das Forschungsprojekt entstand im Rahmen eines Hauptseminars mit dem Titel "Zwischen Besatzung, "Amerikanisierung" und dem Kampf um die Bürgerrechte: Die Stationierung von US-Streitkräften in Westdeutschland", welches im Sommersemester 2014 an der Universität Augsburg am Lehrstuhl für Europäische Ethnologie/Volkskunde von der US-amerikanischen Historikerin Prof. Dr. Maria Höhn gehalten wurde. Die Laufzeit des Projekts betrug von August 2014 bis September 2015 und wurde zeitweise innerhalb einer kleinen Forschungsgruppe von fünf Studentinnen unter der Betreuung von Prof. Dr. Günther Kronenbitter absolviert.

 

1. Einleitung  |  2. Präsenz der Black Panther  |  3. Aktivitäten der Black Panther  |  4. Segregation innerhalb des US-Militärs und auf den Straßen Augsburgs  |  5. Die Reaktion des US-Militärs  |  6. Solidarisierungsbewegung in Augsburg?  |  7. Augsburger Black Panther im gesamtdeutschen Kontext - Fazit  |  Literatur

 
View research paper as PDF.

1. Einleitung
 
Mit dem Einmarsch der US-amerikanischen Soldaten am 28. April 1945 begann eine Geschichte der transatlantischen Beziehungen und Verflechtungen zweier Kulturen, welche durch die amerikanische Militärpräsenz in der US-Garnisonsstadt Augsburg über ein halbes Jahrhundert andauerte. Die letzten US-GIs verließen im Juni 1998 die Kasernen und läuteten somit zeitgleich das Ende der prägenden Nachkriegsgeschichte der US-Amerikaner in Augsburg ein.

Betrachtet man das Augsburger Stadtbild mit offenen Augen, ist die amerikanische Präsenz, trotz der fehlenden Anwesenheit des Militärs und dessen Streitkräften, nach wie vor ein zentraler Bestandteil der Stadt im Süden Bayerns. Obwohl aus architektonischer Sicht nur wenige Bauwerke, wie beispielsweise der Hotelturm, auf den Einfluss der ehemaligen Besatzer verweisen, finden sich Spuren von Amerika in Augsburg auch über 15 Jahre nach Schließung der Kasernen an vielen Stellen wieder. Sportvereine, wie die American Football oder Baseball Teams, Stadtteile rund um die ehemaligen Kasernen mit den Namen Sheridan oder Reese, Übernahmen von Brauchtümern wie Halloween sowie zahlreiche weitere Beispiele visualisieren die Anwesenheit der amerikanischen Kultur hier in Augsburg und fungieren als Symbole der transatlantischen Kultureinflüsse.

Oftmals abwertend als Coca-Cola-Colonization oder Amerikanisierung bezeichnet, meinen diese Begriffe hauptsächlich die Übernahme US-amerikanischer Kulturgüter aus sämtlichen Lebensbereichen, welche den deutschen Markt nicht nur überfluteten. Mancher Beobachter vermutete, geprägt von Skepsis beziehungsweise Furcht, sogleich einen Verlustdes Deutschtums durch die bevorstehende kulturelle Verdrängung mittels nordamerikanischer Ersatzgüter. Es erfolgte daher nicht nur eine Betitelung von Musikrichtungen und Tanzstilen wie Rock’n’Roll oder Jazz als rohe Bedrohungen von Sitte, Anstand und Moral.1  Jugendkultur in Jeans und Elvis-Haartolle war in vielen Augen dem Sittenverfall zum Opfer gefallen und die zunehmende Sexualisierung des weiblichen Geschlechts führte von einer kritischen Hinterfragung des American Way of Life zu einer Diabolisierung ebenjenes. Insbesondere die innenpolitischen Geschehnisse Mitte der 1960er Jahre in den Vereinigten Staaten, angetrieben vom Civil Rights Movement rund um Martin Luther King Jr. und die auftauchenden Rassenunruhen in der segregierten Armee auch auf deutschen Militärbasen, strapazierten die Beziehungen zwischen Deutschen und US-Amerikanern an mancher Stelle enorm.


Befasst man sich nun eingehender mit dem kulturellen Austausch zwischen diesen beiden Nationen, liegt die Tendenz bei einer Sichtweise einer Amerikanisierung der deutschen Gesellschaft, gewissermaßen also einem einseitigen Kulturtransfer. Der deutschen Seite werden Güter wie Musik, Tanz, Mode, Lebensmittel usw. aufgezwängt, von einem Austausch im eigentlichen Sinne kann unter diesem Blickwinkel jedoch nicht gesprochen werden. Es entsteht letztendlich das Bild einer kulturellen Einbahnstraße hinsichtlich des Transfers transatlantischer Dimensionen. Jedoch sind die Einflüsse der deutschen Seite auf die US-amerikanische Präsenz in Deutschland im Großen, Augsburg im Kleinen, insbesondere die Unabhängigkeitsbestrebungen der afroamerikanischen GIs nicht zu unterschätzen. Erst die Erfahrungen, die diese Soldaten im ehemaligen Land der Nationalsozialisten machen konnten, veranlassten ganze Massen dazu, sich der Bürgerrechtsbewegung in ihrem Heimatland anzuschließen, um zu Hause für dieselben Rechte zu kämpfen, welche ihnen fernab der Heimat bereits zugesprochen wurden. Wie der US-amerikanische Autor William Gardner Smith feststellt, “treated as social equals in postwar Germany, African American GIs would ‘never go back to the old way again’.2


Im Forschungsprojekt zum Black Panther Movement in Augsburg steht an dieser Stelle die Frage im Fokus, welchen Einfluss die transatlantischen Erfahrungen in Deutschland auf die hier stationierten afroamerikanischen Soldaten hinsichtlich der Politisierung der Bürgerrechtsbewegung hatte. Die Black Panther Bewegung als radikalisierte Ausformung des afroamerikanischen Civil Rights Movement wurde aufgrund einiger Hinweise in der bisherigen Forschung auch für den Standort Augsburg vermutet und bildet das Zentrum der Untersuchungen innerhalb des Projekts. Dabei wird nicht nur deren Existenz und Aktivität beleuchtet, sondern auch die Reaktionen innerhalb der deutschen Bevölkerung, die (lokale) Medienberichterstattung, sowie die Vorgehensweise der US-amerikanischen Militärverwaltung im Hinblick auf die steigenden Rassenunruhen in den Augsburger Kasernen. Gerade die Erfahrungen von alltäglichem Rassismus und Diskriminierungen innerhalb einer rassisch segregierten Armee prägten das zukünftige Leben vieler ehemaliger GIs auch lange über den Aufenthalt in Deutschland hinaus.


Des Weiteren wird im Speziellen die Präsenz der radikalen Black Panther und deren vermutete Kollaborationen mit linken Studenten für den Standort aufgearbeitet und untersucht, um vermeintliche Zusammenhänge zwischen der Protestkultur der deutschen ́68er Bewegung und der Black Power Bewegung der USA aufzeigen zu können.


Der Fokus der Forschung liegt hierbei auf den Jahren 1968-1973 und analysiert nicht nur die Präsenz der Black Panther Bewegung für den Standort Augsburg, sondern setzt diese auch in einen gesamtdeutschen Kontext.

 

2. Präsenz der Black Panther

Nachdem sich in der Sekundärliteratur zu unserem Forschungsthema bereits erste Hinweise auf eine Präsenz der Black Panther Bewegung finden ließen, stießen wir bei unseren Recherchen in den unterschiedlichsten Medien auf deren Spuren. Während der Sichtung der Voice of the Lumpen bestätigte sich zunächst die Existenz der Black Panther in Augsburg. Auf der Titelseite einer Ausgabe vom April 19713 wird der Stellenwert der Untergrundzeitung für den Standort Augsburg deutlich: in einer Auflistung der VOL mit Städten in welchen mögliche Zielgruppen der Zeitung ansässig sind, ist Augsburg neben weiteren bayerischen Garnisonsstädten wie Erlangen, Nürnberg und München aufgeführt worden (Abb. 1: Frontcover, Voice of the Lumpen, Vol. 1 Nr. 4 (fourth edition) vom April 1971).

Desweiteren bestätigte sich unsere Annahme einer Aktivität der Black Panther durch einen Artikel in der Augsburger Allgemeinen Zeitung vom 7. Juli 1971, in welchem auch der Anführer der lokalen Black Panther Bewegung der 25-jährige Anthony Tucker zu den Zielen der Bewegung in Augsburg interviewt wurde4 (Abb. 2: Kein Räuber unter Black Panthers – Vietnam GIs noch zu aggressiv... In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 07.07.1971, Jahrg. 27, Nr. 152, S. 22).

Auch durch den auf einem Flugblatt abgedruckten Hinweis einer geplanten Informationsveranstaltung in Augsburg, bei welcher Repräsentanten der Black Panther Partei in der BRD sprechen sollten (Abb. 3: Solidarität mit der Black Panther Partei, vierseitiges Flugblatt aus dem Staatsarchiv München, Mittelteil rechts, verteilt an der Universität München am 11.12.1969, verantwortlich: Solidaritätskomitee für die Black Panther Partei. Besitzanzeige: Staatsarchiv München, Akt der Polizeidirektion München Nr. 9543), konnte auf eine lokale Präsenz der Black Panther geschlossen werden.5 Somit konnte eine Existenz der Black Panther an dieser Stelle durch vollkommen unabhängige Printmedien der US-amerikanischen und deutschen Seite für den Standort Augsburg nachgewiesen werden.

   

Abb. 1

Abb. 2

Abb. 3

 

3. Aktivitäten der Black Panther

Nachdem sich die Existenz der Bewegung bereits zu Beginn der Recherchen zweifelsfrei nachweisen ließ, suchten wir in einem zweiten Schritt nach Spuren von Aktivitäten der Black Panther Bewegung in Augsburg. Galten die Black Panther im Allgemeinen als eine radikalsierte Strömung innerhalb der gesamten Bürgerrechtsbewegung der Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika, machten insbesondere die Zwischenfälle, welche der Bewegung zugesprochen wurden, weltweite Schlagzeilen. Fälle wie der von Angela Davis prägten sowohl die Medien, als auch die politischen Maßnahmen der damaligen Zeit und wurden von den Schwarzen Panthern umgehend für ihre eigenen Zwecke und Propaganda umfunktionalisiert.

Obwohl der Augsburger Standort, verglichen mit anderen (west)deutschen Militärstützpunkten der US-Army, verhältnismäßig ruhig erschien und die Black Panther Bewegung sich hier als relativ klein herauskristallisierte, machten gerade einige wenige, dafür jedoch heftige Zwischenfälle im Bezug auf Augsburg auch über die Stadtgrenzen hinaus von sich reden. Der erste dieser Art ereignete sich im Dezember 1969 im Kasernenkino auf dem Gelände der Augsburger Sheridan Kaserne. Erstmals taucht in diesem Artikel mit der Schlagzeile Rassenkrieg trübt Weihnachtsfrieden der Begriff Black Power im Zusammenhang mit Augsburg auf (Abb. 4: Rassenkrieg trübt Weihnachtsfrieden. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 05.12.1969, Jahrg. 25, Nr. 280, S. 40). Inhaltlich heißt es zu den Vorkommnissen auf den Augsburger Militärbasen weiter wie folgt:

Eine Rassendemonstration von knapp hundert Negersoldaten gegenüber ihrem General während eines Footballspiels und der tätliche Angriff eines farbigen Feldwebels auf einen weißen Oberstleutnant im Amerika-Hotel sind nur zwei von vielen Vorkommnissen in letzter Zeit, über welche offizielle US-Stellen einen Mantel des Schweigens zu breiten versuchen. [...] Die Militärpolizei war nach unseren Recherchen aber verständigt worden, als dort [im Kino der Sheridan-Kaserne] zwischen schwarzen und weißen Soldaten schon Bierdosen und Fäuste flogen. Die dunkelhäutigen Kameraden wollten nämlich nicht aufstehen, als zum Kinobeginn die US- Nationalhymne gespielt wurde. Viele der Schwarzen blieben nicht nur sitzen, sondern streckten noch die geballte rechte Faust zum Black-Power-Gruß in die Höhe.6

Zwar soll es „bisher noch keine Aktivität der Negerorganisation Black Power im hiesigen Bereich gegeben haben“, dennoch wurden die Aktivitäten der afroamerikanischen GIs seit diesem Zeitpunkt strenger beobachtet und sogar „Neger-Meetings sind jetzt im Augsburger Kasernenbereich offiziell verboten worden“,7 wie in dem Artikel weiter geschrieben steht. Anhand dieses Zwischenfalls kann schließlich auch aufgezeigt werden, dass die Bewegung in Augsburg, sowie die Auseinandersetzungen aufgrund der Rassengegensätze auch außerhalb der Grenzen Augsburgs in der Medienberichterstattung thematisiert wurden. So berichteten sowohl die Münchner Abendzeitung8 (Abb. 5: Soldaten drohen mit „heißem Winter“. In: Münchner Abendzeitung vom 8.12.69, Nr. 285. S. 9) als auch die Süddeutsche Zeitung9 (Abb. 6: Unruhe in Augsburger Kasernen. In: Süddeutsche Zeitung vom 9.12.69, Nr. 294. S. 14) in ihren Ausgaben ebenfalls vom Zwischenfall im Augsburger Kasernenkino.

   

Abb. 4

Abb. 5

Abb. 6


Weitere Zwischenfälle, welche sich im Zusammenhang mit den Black Panthern in Augsburg ereigneten, fanden ebenfalls ihren Einzug in die Berichterstattung der Augsburger Lokalpresse. Die immer stärker auftretenden Rassenkonflikte zwischen afroamerikanischen GIs und ihren, in der Regel, Weißen Vorgesetzten spitzten die Situation immer weiter zu und fanden ihren Höhepunkt Mitte 1970 bis Anfang des Jahres 1971. Nicht nur aufgrund der Häufung der Zwischenfälle, sondern auch im Zusammenhang mit der gesteigerten Brutalität und Gewaltbereitschaft, etablierte sich immer mehr das Bild, „dass die US-Armee am Rande eines Rassenkrieges“10 (Abb. 7: Schwarzer Soldat kämpft um seine weiße Weste. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 28.10.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 248, S. 3) steht. Von Berichten einer Bombendrohung der Black Panther auf dem Kasernengelände11 (Abb. 8: Die Black Panthers sind auf dem Sprung. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 03.11.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 253, S. 18), über Artikel zu gewalttätigen Demonstrationen vor Nachtlokalen12 (Abb. 9: Black-Power-Demonstration in Pfersee. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 28.04.1971, Jahrg. 27, Nr. 97, S. 36), bis hin zu Meldungen über explodierte Handgranaten auf einem Truppenübungsplatz13 (Abb. 10: GIs wollten Tanzlokal ausräuchern. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 02.06.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 123, S. 17), häuften sich die Vorkommnisse derart, dass kaum eine Woche verging ohne dramatische Ereignisse. Diese gipfelten schließlich in einem Vorfall auf dem Truppenübungsplatz während eines Manövers in Hohenfels, als GIs der in Augsburg stationierten 1. US-Infanterie-Division, eine Handgranate in die Kantine warfen, bei dem zehn Soldaten zum Teil schwer verletzt wurden. Nicht nur in den Medien schrieb man diese Tat den Black Panthern zu, auch die US-amerikanische Militärverwaltung klagte einen in Augsburg stationierten Schwarzen Soldaten vor dem höchsten amerikanischen Kriegsgericht an (vgl. Abb. 7).14

   

Abb. 7

Abb. 8

Abb. 9


Ein weiteres Beispiel für das Durchgreifen der Justiz ist die Verhaftung des US-amerikanischen Zivilisten Larry Barnes, welche landesweit für Furore sorgte. Der Herausgeber der Voice of the Lumpen wurde im Mai 1971 in einer Augsburger Bar festgenommen – im Jägerhaus in Oberhausen – als er den dort anwesenden afroamerikanischen Soldaten Material der Black Panther Bewegung anbot (Abb. 11: Deutsche Justiz auf Black-Panther-Jagd. In: Süddeutsche Zeitung vom 18.5.1971, Nr. 118. S. 26).15 In der Anzeige des Augsburger Stadtamtmannes hieß der Tatvorwurf folgendermaßen:

   

Abb. 10

Abb. 11

Abb. 12

Der dunkelfarbige Zivilamerikaner hat nach der Feststellung des 5. Polizeireviers in der vergangenen Nacht in hiesiger Gaststätte ‚Jägerhaus‘ an dort anwesende – meist dunkelfarbige – Gäste Zeitungen, Bücher und Abzeichen politischen Inhalts zum Verkauf angeboten bzw. verkauft. Diese Druckerzeugnisse sollen dem Polizeibericht nach von der sog. politisch-extremen Black Power Bewegungvertrieben werden. Sämtlicher Erzeugnisse sind in englischer Sprache abgefasst und offenbar in erster Linie für die US-Soldaten schwarzer Hautfarbe bestimmt.16

Barnes wurde zunächst aus fadenscheinigen Begründungen verhaftet und schließlich erließ man Haftbefehl, weil dieser verdächtigt sei, Schriften mit „zersetzenden Inhalt“ zu verteilen, die sich gegen die Regierung der Vereinigten Staaten richten und zu „widersetzlichen Handlungen auffordern“17 (Abb. 12: What The VOL Is Doing. In: Voice of the Lumpen. Vol. 1, No. 5. S. 2).

Neben den radikalen Vorkommnissen im Zuge von Segregation und Rassengegensätzen, bestand eine der Hauptaufgaben der Black Panther Bewegung zudem in der Akquise von Neuankömmlingen als künftige Mitglieder und deren Aufklärung über die (politische) Situation im Militär. Im Interview mit der Augsburger Allgemeinen Zeitung äußerte dies der Augsburger Anführer der Black Panther, Anthony Tucker, ebenfalls als ein Ziel der Bewegung.18 Aus diesem Grund organisierte die Party in Westdeutschland zahlreiche Kundgebungen, Informationsveranstaltungen, aber auch Protestdemonstrationen, um sowohl künftige Mitglieder aus den Reihen des US-Militärs, als auch Sympathisanten unter der deutschen Bevölkerung zu gewinnen. Dazu verteilte man insbesondere an Universitäten gerne Flugblätter, wie unter anderem das Beispiel vom 11. Dezember 1969 veranschaulicht, das an der Münchner Universität verbreitet wurde19 (Abb. 13: Solidarität mit der Black Panther Partei, vierseitiges Flugblatt aus dem Staatsarchiv München, Frontseite, verteilt an der Universität München am 11.12.1969, verantwortlich: Solidaritätskomitee für die Black Panther Partei. Besitzanzeige: Staatsarchiv München, Akt der Polizeidirektion München Nr. 9543). Angekündigt wurde in dem mehrseitigen Schreiben des Black Panther Solidaritätskomitees, neben einer allgemeinen Vorstellung der Bewegung und dem Aufruf nach einer Solidarisierung, unter anderem eine Kundgebung in Augsburg bei der Repräsentanten der Partei in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland sprechen sollten.20 Aus bisher ungeklärten Gründen fand diese Veranstaltung in Augsburg jedoch nicht statt.

   
   

Abb. 13

 

 

 

4. Segregation innerhalb des US-Militärs und auf den Straßen Augsburgs

Bereits zu Beginn der Recherchen stellte sich schon heraus, welche enge Verknüpfung zwischen dem eigentlichen Thema der Untersuchung, den Black Panthers, und der vorhandenen rassischen Segregation innerhalb des Militärs bestand. Kamen die US-Amerikaner nach Ende des Zweiten Weltkrieges als Befreier nach Nazideutschland, war ihre eigene Armee viele Jahrzehnte später immer noch von Diskriminierung und rassischer Segregation durchdrungen. Zwar ordnete Präsident Truman die de jure Integration des Militärs in seinem „Executive Order 9981“ vom 26. Juli 1948 an, de facto jedoch sah es mit der Integration innerhalb der Truppen ganz anders aus und diese dauerte bis weit in die Zeit der Koreakriege hinein.

Obwohl die Themen Segregation und Diskriminierung in der lokalen Presse kaum oder nur am Rande erwähnt wurden, deutete sich deren Vorhandensein in den Augsburger Kasernen vor allen Dingen in den Zeitzeugeninterviews an. Schon hinsichtlich der Unterbringung trennte man vor Ort zwischen Schwarzer und Weißer Hautfarbe, wie folgender Ausschnitt aus einem Interview bestätigte:

„[...] in den Zimmern waren immer nur jeweils zwei Weiße oder zwei Schwarze Soldaten untergebracht, aber niemals gemischt in einem Zimmer[...]“

Doch nicht nur in den Schlafunterkünften, auch in der Kantine sowie der Freizeitgestaltung im Allgemeinen konnte man diese Form der Gruppierung nach Hautfarbe laut der Erzählung eines Zeitzeugen beobachten, der erzählte:

„Und au wenn die dann irgendwo mal zum essen gangen sin, oder irgendwie auch wenn die in der Arbeit waren und es war Mittagspause, die ham sich immer Weiß zu Weiß gsetzt und Schwarz zu Schwarz gsetzt. Und die Rassendiskriminierung damals zu dieser Zeit war schon auf jeden Fall noch gegeben. Also die ham ihre Freizeit nicht miteinander verbracht.“

Weiter spiegelte sich die Segregation auch in getrennten Clubs auf dem Kasernengelände wider:

„Also auf jeden Fall gab es zwei Clubs. Der Andere war der EM Club, da sin die Schwarzen hingangen. Da hasch du vereinzelt vielleicht mal nen einzelnen Weißen Amerikaner gesehn. Ansonsten was da Weiß rumgrennt war, waren deutsche Mädels und wenn die vielleicht noch mal nen Bruder oder irgendwas mitbracht ham. Sonst wars da drinne stockdunkel.“

Doch neben der getrennten Freizeitgestaltung, erfuhren die Afroamerikanischen GIs auch hinsichtlich der Karrierechancen und Beförderungsmöglichkeiten innerhalb der Truppen eine gewisse Form der Diskriminierung. So konstatiert ein ehemaliger deutscher Angestellter für die US-Army in Augsburg:

„Schwarze wurden nicht so gut befördert wie die Weißen Soldaten; Schwarze mussten häufig niedrigere Tätigkeiten ausführen, mehr oder weniger die Drecksarbeiten.“

„[...] So wie wir das mitbekommen haben, würde ich eigentlich sagen, da hatten wir Deutsche mit den weißen Amerikanern einen freundschaftlicheren Kontakt als die Weißen zu den Farbigen. Wie gesagt die haben immer die Dreckarbeit machen müssen. Aber wie gesagt es hat auch welche gegeben die Feldwebel waren, die eine Funktion hatten, wie Küchenfeldwebel oder andere Funktionen, hat es auch gegeben, ja. [...]“

Dieser ging sogar soweit zu behaupten, dass ehemalige Mitglieder der SS, von deren vergangener Karriere im Nationalsozialismus das US-Militär unterrichtet war, bessere Aufstiegschancen hatten, als afroamerikanische Soldaten ihrer eigenen Kompanie.

Alles in allem lässt sich für den Standort Augsburg konstatieren, dass sowohl rassische Segregation, als auch diverse Formen der Diskriminierung ebenso präsent waren, wie in allen anderen Garnisonsstädten auch. Diese traf man hier nicht nur innerhalb des Kasernengeländes an, sondern auch außerhalb in den örtlichen Nachtlokalen, bei der Wohnungssuche oder in der Begegnung mit der deutschen Bevölkerung. Hinsichtlich der steigenden Vorkommnisse, welche nahezu allesamt auf interne Konflikte im Bezug auf die Diskriminierung der Afroamerikaner zurückzuführen waren, stieg die Verunsicherung innerhalb der deutschen Bevölkerung zunehmend. Daher stand im Zuge unserer Recherchen auch die Reaktion des US-Militärs auf die steigenden Zwischenfälle im Fokus der Untersuchung.

 

5. Die Reaktion des US-Militärs

Gerade in den Jahren um 1970, als sich Zwischenfälle mit Angehörigen des US-Militärs stetig häuften, wurde die Augsburger Bevölkerung laut der Berichterstattung in den Medien stark verunsichert und die Gegenseite somit zum Handeln und Eingreifen gezwungen. Agierte die US- amerikanische Militärführung über Jahre hinweg unter der Prämisse der Vertuschung und Beschwichtigung der Geschehnisse21 (Abb. 14: MP: Keine Rassenkonflikte. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 06.09.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr. 205, S. 28) - insbesondere im Hinblick auf sogenannte Rassenunruhen innerhalb der Einheiten - außerhalb des Kasernengeländes, sahen sich die Befehlshaber unter anderem durch den Druck der Stadt Augsburg dazu veranlasst, konkrete Maßnahmen zur Eindämmung und Bekämpfung der Probleme zu ergreifen22 (Abb. 15: US-Übergriffe beunruhigen die Augsburger. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 19.09.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr. 216, S.20).

„[...] er [der Schwarze General] hat mich gefragt und so weiter, er hätte in Amerika ghört, dass es so viel Scherereien mit Schwarzen gibt und so weiter. [...] und der hat sich dann hingsetzt und hat gsagt „so geht’s nicht“. Und der hat dann des ins Leben grufen, dass man sich trifft – und das die Leute von diesen Einrichtungen wos des Palaver geben hat auch wirklich mit dann am Tisch sitzen, dass man sagt: „okay, mir könntn des so und so ... gebens uns Ihre Meinung und wir sagen dann von unserer Seite was geht. Und dann hat sich das auch wirklich gebessert.

   

Abb. 14

Abb. 15

Abb. 16


Eine Verschärfung der Ausgehregelungen für US-Soldaten23 (Abb. 16: Die Schwarzen Panther blieben ruhig. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 10.11.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 259, S. 18), eine verstärkte Streifenpatrouille der Military Police24 (Abb. 17: General will heißen Sommer verhüten. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 10.07.1971, Jahrg. 27, Nr. 155, S. 30) und schließlich die Initiierung des Black-Studies- Programm25 (Abb. 18: US-Soldaten lernen Toleranz. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 21.12.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 294, Seite 19) sprechen jedoch eine deutliche Sprache und widerlegen die stets wiederholte Behauptung der US-Kommandeure, dass es keine Auseinandersetzungen im Zusammenhang mit rassistischen Konflikten gegeben hätte. Das von der Militärverwaltung initiierte Black-Studies- Program machte sich demnach zur Aufgabe, den amerikanischen Soldaten Toleranz gegenüber ihren afroamerikanischen Kameraden, sowie deren Kultur zu lehren und damit den Grundstein für die Aufhebung der Rassentrennung in den Köpfen zu legen26 (Abb. 19: 1st Inf Div Sharpening Up It's Black Studies Program. In: Stars and Stripes (European Edition) vom 10.11.1970, Vol. 29, Nr. 206, S. 1). In einem Sieben-Wochen-Kurs im Ausbildungszentrum der Sheridan-Kaserne erhoffte man sich durch die Aufklärung eine Beruhigung der aufgeheizten Stimmung innerhalb der örtlichen Kasernen. Was den Erfolg des Programms anbelangt, erfährt der Leser im Artikel der Augsburger Allgemeinen Zeitung nur wenige Zeilen später folgendes:

Anfang August schrieben sich 37 Soldaten, darunter nur fünf Weiße, für den Kursbeginn ein. Weniger als die Hälfte erreichten den Abschluss. Leutnant Arment ist enttäuscht, dass sich nicht mehr Weiße für das Programm interessieren. Sein Argument: gegenseitiges Verstehen müsse von beiden Seiten angestrebt werden.27

   

Abb. 17

Abb. 18

Abb. 19


Grundsätzlich lässt sich im Zusammenhang mit dem US-amerikanischen Militär eine vorherrschende Beschwichtigungstaktik und partielle Verdrängung der Geschehnisse, zumindest nach außen hin, festhalten. Da die Zwischenfälle sich in einem verhältnismäßig kurzen Zeitraum jedoch enorm häuften und die angespannte und zeitweise explosive Stimmung sich auch außerhalb des Kasernengeländes verbreitete, wurde man auf diese Weise zu einer Reaktion gezwungen. Dennoch verhielten sich die Verantwortlichen eher passiv und versuchten den Informationsfluss weiter zu kontrollieren, so dass kaum offizielle Statements zu Vorkommnissen gemacht wurden. Lediglich im Fall der Anschläge in Hohenfels, versprach man eine schnelle Aufklärung. Alles in allem erschwerte dieses Vorgehen die Informationssuche innerhalb des Forschungsprojekts enorm, so dass mit zahlreichen weiteren Hinweisen im Bezug auf die Black Panther Bewegung letztendlich nur auf einer spekulativen Ebene umgegangen werden konnte.

 

6. Solidarisierungsbewegung in Augsburg?

In seiner Dissertation zu den afroamerikanischen GIs in Deutschland konstatiert der Historiker Oliver Schmidt, dass sich in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland eine beachtliche Unterstützerszene für den GI-Untergrund etablierte. Nun galt es, diese These auch für den Standort Augsburg zu überprüfen.

   
   

Abb. 20

   


Hinsichtlich der lokalen Solidarisierungsbewegung muss nach unseren Recherchen festgehalten werden, dass es keine eindeutige, kollektive Solidarisierung mit der Black Power Bewegung in Augsburg gegeben hat. Zwar finden sich in den Jahren 1967 und 1968 vermehrt Hinweise auf Protestveranstaltungen und Demonstrationen gegen den Krieg in Vietnam28 (Abb. 20: Demonstration gegen den Krieg in Vietnam. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 04.07.1967, Jahrg. 23, Nr. 150, S.10 und Abb. 21: Bei Feiern an Vietnam erinnert. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 05.07.1967, Jahrg. 23, Nr. 151, S. 23), jedoch richtete sich der Protest gegen die Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika und deren Politik im Allgemeinen. Laut eines Zeitzeugen, der die Augsburger Protestbewegung maßgeblich mitbestimmte, betrachteten die Demonstranten Amerika als kollektives Feindbild und differenzierten dabei nicht zwischen Schwarz und Weiß. Demnach wurden die Themen Segregation, Diskriminierung und die afroamerikanische Bürgerrechtsbewegung nicht inhaltlich aufgegriffen, oder sich damit eindeutig solidarisiert. Während man in anderen Städten wie München eine Verknüpfung der beiden Themen Vietnamkrieg und Black Panther Bewegung innerhalb der Protestveranstaltungen nachweisen konnte29 (Abb. 22a und b: Vietnam- Alles für den großen Sieg in Vietnam!, doppelseitig bedrucktes Flugblatt aus der Flugblattsammlung der Universitätsbibliothek München, Rückseite, verteilt an der Universität München am 13.11.1969, verantwortlich: ASTA Universität/Technische Hochschule/Kunstakademie/Sozialistisches Informationszentrum. Besitzanzeige: Universitätsbibliothek der LMU München/ Flugblätter aus der Universität München (=WU 4 71- 179)), blieben diese in Augsburg weiterhin stets separiert.

   

Abb. 21

Abb. 22a

Abb. 22b


Einen Sonderfall bildet die Augsburger Protestbewegung, speziell im gesamtdeutschen Vergleich, auch im Hinblick auf die Teilnehmer und aktiven Protagonisten selbst. Die lokale '68er Bewegung wurde hier nicht von Studenten getragen, sondern von Gymnasiasten, Auszubildenden und jungen Erwachsenen. Grund hierfür ist an dieser Stelle sicherlich die Tatsache, dass die Gründung der Augsburger Universität erst im Jahr 1970 stattfand.

Dennoch beschränkte sich das Engagement einiger Aktivisten nicht nur auf die Veranstaltung von Protesten, Kundgebungen und Demonstrationen, sondern nahm im Fall des „GI Information Center“ am Milchberg durchaus auch konkrete Formen der Unterstützung an30 (Abb. 23: Wenn GIs desertieren wollen. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 27.03.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr. 73, S. 20). Dieses - von deutschen Aktivisten der Gruppierung „Kritisches Seminar und Kampagne für Abrüstung und Demokratie“ gegründete - Informationszentrum setzte sich zum Ziel, interessierte US-amerikanische Soldaten im Hinblick auf die Desertion zu beraten, um einem Einsatz in Vietnam entgehen zu können31 (Abb. 24: US-Soldaten zum Desertieren aufgefordert. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 03.02.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr. 28, S. 27).

   

Abb. 23

Abb. 24

Abb. 25


Zwar kann im Augsburger Fall keineswegs von einer Solidarisierungsbewegung im Hinblick auf das Civil Rights Movement gesprochen werden, dennoch wurden insbesondere die Organisation und Durchführung von Demonstrationen, Protesten, Sit-Ins32 (Abb. 25: Vietkongfahnen flattern am Königsplatz. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 01.04.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr. 77, S. 20) oder ähnlichen Maßnahmen stark von der afroamerikanischen Bürgerrechtsbewegung geprägt und hinterließ seine Spuren in Augsburg. Dies stellt somit eine Form des transatlantischen Kulturaustausches im Hinblick auf die Protestkultur dar.

 

7. Augsburger Black Panther im gesamtdeutschen Kontext - Fazit

Die Existenz und Aktivität der lokalen Black Panther Bewegung in Augsburg ließ sich anhand des gefundenen Materials für den Zeitraum weniger Jahre eindeutig nachweisen. Im Vergleich zu größeren deutschen Städten, wie Berlin, Frankfurt oder Heidelberg hielt sich ihr Engagement verhältnismäßig in Grenzen, jedoch machten gerade einige heftige Zwischenfälle, wie der Hohenfelsanschlag und die Verhaftung von Larry Barnes über die Stadtgrenzen hinaus von sich Reden.

Die Präsenz der Bewegung verdeutlicht, dass auch das Leben der hier stationierten afroamerikansichen GIs geprägt war von Segregation, Diskriminierung und alltäglichem Rassismus und sich ein stetig ansteigendes Aufbegehren gegenüber der vorhandenen Ungerechtigkeiten entwickelte. In der Folge konnten und wollten sich die Schwarzen Soldaten nicht länger mit dieser Opferrolle abfinden und identifizieren, stattdessen nun vielmehr für ihre Rechte und Freiheit eintreten. Im Sinne dieses stattfindenden Umschwungs schloss der Anführer der Black Panther Bewegung, Anthony Tucker, sein Interview mit der Augsburger Allgemeinen Zeitung mit den nachfolgenden Worten: „Was für mich wirklich wichtig ist? Nur Eines: Auch wir Farbigen haben Anspruch auf unser persönliches Glück und unseren persönlichen Erfolg. Wir wollen von jedermann als Mensch akzeptiert werden. Das wollte ich noch sagen. Mehr nicht.“33

 

Literatur

1. Einleitung
1) Christina Giorcelli, Living With America: 1946-1996. European Contributions to American Studies, Bd. 38. (Amsterdam: VU University Press, 1997) S. 34.
2) Maria Höhn und Martin Klimke, A breath of freedom: The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs, and Germany. (New York City: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010) S. 1.

nach oben

2. Präsenz der Black Panther
3) Frontcover. In: Voice of the Lumpen. Vol. 1, No. 4 (Forth Edition). S. 1.
4) Kein Räuber unter Black Panthers – Vietnam GIs noch zu aggressiv. In: Augsburger Allgemeiner Zeitung vom
07.07.1971, Jahrg. 27, Nr. 152, S. 22.
5) Solidarität mit der Black Panther Partei, vierseitiges Flugblatt aus dem Staatsarchiv München, Mittelteil rechts, verteilt an der Universität München am 11.12.1969, verantwortlich: Solidaritätskomitee für die Black Panther Partei. Besitzanzeige: Staatsarchiv München, Akt der Polizeidirektion München Nr. 9543.

nach oben

3. Aktivitäten der Black Panther
6) Rassenkrieg trübt Weihnachtsfrieden. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 05.12.1969, Jahrg. 25, Nr. 280, S. 40.
7) Beide Zitate: Ibid.
8) Soldaten drohen mit „heißem Winter“. In: Münchner Abendzeitung vom 8.12.69, Nr. 285. S. 9.
9) Unruhe in Augsburger Kasernen. In: Süddeutsche Zeitung vom 9.12.69, Nr. 294, S. 14.
10) Schwarzer Soldat kämpft um seine weiße Weste. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 28.10.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 248, S. 3.
11) Die Black Panthers sind auf dem Sprung. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 03.11.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr.253, S.18.
12) Black-Power-Demonstration in Pfersee. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 28.04.1971, Jahrg. 27, Nr.97, S.36.
13) GIs wollten Tanzlokal ausräuchern. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 02.06.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 123, S.17.
14) Schwarzer Soldat kämpft um seine weiße Weste. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 28.10.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 248, S. 3.
15) Deutsche Justiz auf Black-Panther-Jagd. In: Süddeutsche Zeitung vom 18.5.1971, Nr. 118. S. 26.
16) Ege, Moritz: Schwarz werden. „Afroamerikanophilie“ in den 1960er und 1970er Jahren, Bielefeld 2007, S.107.
17) What The VOLIs Doing. In: Voice of the Lumpen. Vol. 1, No. 5. S.2.
18) Kein Räuber unter Black Panthers – Vietnam GIs noch zu aggressiv... In: Augsburger Allgemeiner Zeitung vom 07.07.1971, Jahrg. 27, Nr. 152, S. 22.
19) Solidarität mit der Black Panther Partei, vierseitiges Flugblatt aus dem Staatsarchiv München, Mittelteil links, verteilt an
der Universität München am 11.12.1969, verantwortlich: Solidaritätskomitee für die Black Panther Partei. Besitzanzeige:
Staatsarchiv München, Akt der Polizeidirektion München Nr. 9543.
20) Ibid, Mittelteil rechts.

nach oben

5. Die Reaktion des US-Militärs
21) MP: Keine Rassenkonflikte. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 06.09.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr.205, S.28.
22) US-Übergriffe beunruhigen die Augsburger. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 19.09.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr. 216, S.20.
23) Die Schwarzen Panther blieben ruhig. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 10.11.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 259, S.18.
24) General will heißen Sommer verhüten. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 10.07.1971, Jahrg. 27, Nr. 155, S. 30.
25) US-Soldaten lernen Toleranz. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 21.12.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 294, Seite 19.
26) 1st Inf Div Sharpening Up It's Black Studies Program. In: Stars and Stripes (European Edition) vom 10.11.1970, Vol. 29, Nr. 206, S. 1.
27) US-Soldaten lernen Toleranz. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 21.12.1970, Jahrg. 26, Nr. 294, Seite 19.

nach oben

6. Solidarisierungsbewegung in Augsburg?
28) Demonstration gegen den Krieg in Vietnam. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 04.07.1967, Jahrg. 23, Nr. 150, S.10. Sowie: Bei Feiern an Vietnam erinnert. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 05.07.1967, Jahrg. 23, Nr. 151, S. 23.
29) Vietnam-Alles für den großen Sieg in Vietnam!, doppelseitig bedrucktes Flugblatt aus der Flugblattsammlung der Universitätsbibliothek München, verteilt an der Universität München am 13.11.1969, verantwortlich: ASTA Universität/Technische Hochschule/Kunstakademie/Sozialistisches Informationszentrum. Besitzanzeige: Universitätsbibliothek der LMU München/ Flugblätter aus der Universität München (=WU 4 71-179).
30) Wenn GIs desertieren wollen. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 27.03.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr. 73, S. 20.
31) US-Soldaten zum Desertieren aufgefordert. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 03.02.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr.28, S. 27.
32) Vietkong fahnen flattern am Königsplatz. In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 01.04.1968, Jahrg. 24, Nr. 77, S. 20.

nach oben

7. Augsburger Black Panther im gesamtdeutschen Kontext - Fazit
33) Kein Räuber unter Black Panthers – Vietnam GIs noch zu aggressiv... In: Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung vom 07.07.1971, Jahrg. 27, Nr. 152, S. 22.

nach oben

 

View research paper as PDF.

East Chapel Hill High School Library

Photography Exhibition: "The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs, and Germany"
Supported by a grant from the Public School Foundation
April 1-30, 2014

Panel Discussion and Reception: "African-American GIs in Germany"
Monday, April 28, 2014, 4-6 pm
ECHHS library

With Professor Priscilla Layne (UNC-German/African American Studies) and Denise Hill (UNC-Journalism)
Special Guests: Emily Goode (Raleigh) and David Caldwell (Chapel Hill)
> Flyer (PDF)


About the Panelists:

  • Priscilla Layne-Kopf is an assistant professor of German and African-American studies at UNC. Her research interests include multiculturalism and Afro-German history and culture.
  • Denise Hill is a Ph.D. candidate and lecturer in journalism at UNC. She has interviewed German wives of American GIs, including her mother, Anna.
  • Emily Goode lived in Wiesbaden, Germany, in the 1950s when her husband, Robert, was stationed there. Her daughter Sharon, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Management at NCCU, was born in Wiesbaden!
  • David Caldwell served in Heidelberg, Germany, in the military police. His father was one of Chapel Hill’s first black police officers; he, too, served on the force. Today he is officially retired but helps direct RENA, the Roberts- Eubanks Neighborhood Association. In 2013, he received the John Hope Franklin Humanitarian Award for decades of service to our community.

National Archives Screening & Panel Discussion of “A Breath of Freedom“

Washington, DC - September 25, 2014

Screening of the documentary “A Breath of Freedom“ and panel discussion at the National Archives in Washington, DC featuring Dr. Frank Smith, Jr. (Director of the African American Civil War Memorial & Museum), Clarence Davis (former Member of Maryland House of Delegates) and Maria Höhn (Vassar College) at the National Archives, Washington, DC. Presented in partnership with the Smithsonian Channel and the Congressional Black Caucus.
> more

 

 

Impressions from the screening & panel discussion at the National Archives, Washington, DC

For a sneak peek of the documentary “A Breath of Freedom“ narrated by Academy-Award winner Cuba Gooding, Jr., see here.

United States Army Garrison Wiesbaden

Photography Exhibition: "The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs, and Germany"

 

Impressions from the Opening

Press

Jedhel Somera: Civil Rights
AFN Europe Update - February 26, 2014

 

Karl Weisel: 'Breath of Freedom': Capturing aspects of the black American experience
www.army.mil - March 11, 2014
> more

Karl Weisel: Breath of Freedom
Herald Union - March 12, 2014
> more


powered by semtracks